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  • White Flux, Harry Morgan
  • Synergy_II_web-Banners_0003_Layer 1

Synergy II

collaborations between creators,

materials and techniques

Childlike Abandon, Laura McKinley

White Flux, Harry Morgan

Synergy, 2015

Synergy II

06.10.17 - 28.10.17

London Glassblowing’s 2015 exhibition ‘Synergy‘ yielded an incredibly diverse set of collaborations between artists, materials and techniques. Now, two years later, the results of the show continue to resonate and confirm what ideas develop when artists push the boundaries of their usual practice.

This October, London Glassblowing is pleased to present ‘Synergy II’ a follow-up exhibition of past collaborations two years on, as well as new developments from a range of different makers.

James Alexander
Scott Benefield
James Devereux
Stuart Hearn
Katherine Huskie
Peter Layton
Bruce Marks
Laura McKinley
Ali Moenck
Harry Morgan
Jochen Ott
Catherine Phillips
Tim Rawlinson
David Reekie
Morag Reekie
Bruno Romanelli
Layne Rowe
Anthony Scala
Cathryn Shilling
Louis Thompson
Vezzini & Chen
Elliot Walker
Andrea Walsh

Laura Mckinley

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  • Childlike Abandon, Laura McKinley
  • Childlike Abandon, Laura McKinley

My goblets are inspired by a 16th century glass used for drinking games in Bavaria. Drinking games were popular in many European countries at this time and special objects were made to promote alcohol consumption in a social and playful manner. When consuming alcohol the tendency is to revert back to a childlike state which has inspired my intriguing and playful drinking goblets.

-Laura McKinley

Harry Morgan

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  • White Flux, Harry Morgan
  • White Flux, Harry Morgan
  • White Flux (detail), Harry Morgan
  • White Flux (detail), Harry Morgan

Harry Morgan’s working process is inspired by the Venetian glassblowing technique, Murrini, where glass stringers are arranged into a pattern within a mould and fused together. Rather than fusing the glass, Harry uses concrete or metal to bind the stringers together and he enjoys exploring the conflicting relationship of the two substances- the tension between the fragile transparent stringers and the brutally dense concrete.

Cathryn Shilling

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  • Garniture, Cathryn Shilling
  • Garniture, Cathryn Shilling
  • Garniture, Cathryn Shilling
  • Garniture, Cathryn Shilling
  • Garniture, Cathryn Shilling

A garniture is a collection of matching, but usually not identical, decorative objects intended to be displayed together. The word garniture derives from the French verb garnir, which means ‘to garnish’.

These pieces are made using the roll-up technique, an adaptation of a Venetian method used by glass blowers for centuries. The vessels are made from pre-fused glass sheets that are picked up hot, rolled and hand blown. The roll-up technique enables Cathryn Shilling to create three dimensional objects that have a greater level of control and design than can usually be achieved in a hot shop.

The final process happens once the glass has cooled. The piece is finished by polishing the pontil mark, the scar left from where the punty iron was broken from the bottom of the vessel. The presence of such a scar indicates that the piece is hand blown.

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